Benefits and Medicinal Uses of Lemon

medicinalLemon is low in calories, carbohydrates and hardly contains any fat.  It is an acidic fruit, containing about 8% citric acid, but when ingested it turns highly alkaline with pH 9.5. Lemon is therefore an excellent contributor to keeping the body’s optimum alkaline state. Our general diet is highly acidic, which can cause wrinkles, dry skin, joint stiffness, fatigue and bone loss. It is therefore important to balance it out with alkaline foods to assist slowing and reversing of these ageing problems. Operating in an alkaline state makes every system in the body work at its highest performance level, and your overall wellbeing is improved.

Further to being very alkaline, lemon is also an excellent source of vitamin C. Additionally it contains vitamin A, various vitamin B and calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron and phosphorous. Adding lemon to the daily diet stimulates the production of enzymes and digestive juices, enhancing the absorption of iron ad calcium.

Lemon’s Youthing Benefits

  • Speedy skin repair – The high vitamin C content aids repair, which naturally slows with age. Vitamin C is needed for the production of collagen (the essential protein that keeps the skin looking young). The Vitamin C is also an excellent immune system booster.
  • Improving digestion – stimulates the digestive juices, which reduce bloating, heartburn, nausea, constipation as well as other digestive issues that increase with age
  • Helps lose weight – research has found that a diet high in vitamin C have better digestive systems, resulting in easier weight regulation
  • Can reduce sugar cravings – pectin (natural fiber in lemon skin) slows down the absorption of glucose and balancing blood sugar levels. Also, studies has actually shown that pectin can make you feel full up to 4 hours!
  • Helps prevent broken veins – the bioflavonoids increase blood flow & circulations (bye cold feet & hands!)
  • Improving bones & joints – high calcium content for the bones and vitamin C assists the development of collagen.
  • Lower levels of LDL (bad cholesterol)
  • Detoxing the body – improving the cleansing function of the liver and pancreas
  • Good anti-inflammatory – having diuretic properties, lemon assists the body in removing excess water retention, which reduces swelling

Tips for Buying Lemons

The thin-skinned but heavy ones contain more juice – which is what you want. Buy organic if possible to avoid the pesticides and other toxins. If you’re planning on using the skin, make sure to buy the ones that are organic and un-waxed.

Uses of Lemon in the Diet:

  • Juices & smoothies
  • Drinks (in teas, water etc.)
  • Dressings and sauces
  • With mains (e.g., seafood)
  • On salads
  • With fruit (also to keep apples from going brown)

Lemon Recipes

Lemon Coconut Squares

medicinal 2

  • 2 cups of unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup of freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup of coconut oil
  • 1 tsp of grated lemon rind
  • 1 tsp of really good vanilla (powder or extract)
  • 2 tbsp of coconut nectar

1) Place all of the ingredients into your food processor and whiz away for about a minute… you want the mixture to appear creamy.
2) Press the mixture down tightly into a parchment lined loaf pan (or something similar in size) and toss it into the freezer for at least an hour…makes it easier to cut them into squares.
3) Remove the pan from the freezer once they’ve hardened and slice.
Note:  if you run a knife under hot water and wipe it dry, the yumminess will slice clean and smooth.

lemon 3

Raw Lemon Curd

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  • 1/3 cup cashews, soaked 4-6 hours
  • 1/4 cup coconut butter
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp water
  • zest of one large lemon
  • 3-4 tbsp raw agave nectar, to taste
  • pinch of salt
  • pinch of turmeric, for color (optional)

Drain and rinse cashews. Place in a food processor or Vitamix blender. Add coconut butter, lemon juice, and water. Blend until completely smooth. Add remaining ingredients and blend until well combined.

lemon 2

Nutritional Values of Lemon

Nutrient Value pr 100g
Energy 29 kcal
Protein 1.1 g
Fat 0.3 g
Carbohydrate 9.3. g
Fiber 2.8 g
Sugar 2.5 g
Water 89 g
Calcium 26 mg
Iron 0.6 mg
Magnesium 8 mg
Phosphorus 16 mg
Potassium 138 mg
Sodium 2 mg
Zinc 0.06 mg
Vitamin C 53 mg
Thiamin 0.04 mg
Riboflavin 0.02 mg
Niacin 0.1 mg
Vitamin B6 0.08 mg
Folate 11 µg
Vitamin A, RAE 1 µg
Vitamin A, IU 22 IU
Vitamin E 0.15 mg
Saturated fat 0.4 g
Monounsaturated 0.01 g
Polyunsaturated 0.09 g


Peyton-Jones, Elizabeth (2011) “Eat Yourself Young”. Quadrille Publishing Limited.


What’s for Breakfast? Sweetcorn Fritters With Roast Tomato.

Recipe of the Day


This time when we returned from Canberra the boot of our car  was filled with plums, tomatoes, sweetcorn, spinach, sweet basil, capsicum, cucumbers and zucchini. All freshly picked from my father’s garden. And two enormous bunches of hydrangea in hues of pink, lilac and blue.

Our holidays are well and truly over and we are getting back into the swing of things. School might not start until next week, but my daughter is back into her swimming routine. I picked her up from the pool this morning. As usual she was absolutely ravenous. “What’s for breakfast?” she asked.

She particularly loves sweetcorn. Especially from her grandfather’s garden. Not surprisingly this is one of her favourite breakfasts. Sweetcorn fritters with roast tomato. Another classic from Bill Granger. It’s still on the menu at Bill’s Cafe. All day. Served with bacon. We decided to give the bacon a miss today. Putting the focus entirely on our beautifully fresh produce.Somehow things always taste better when you grow them yourself.

roasted tomato

Sweetcorn Fritters With Roast Tomato

Serves 4

For the roast tomatoes

4 ripe Roma tomatoes, sliced in half lengthways
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

For the fritters

1 cup plain  flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon paprika
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
2 cups fresh corn kernels from the cob
1/2 cup diced fresh capsicum (pepper)
1/2 cup sliced spring (green) onion
1/4 cup chopped coriander and parsley
4 tablespoons vegetable oil

For the roast tomatoes

PREHEAT the oven to 180 C. Place tomatoes on a baking tray cut side up,and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle liberally with sea salt and pepper.
ROAST in oven for 20 minutes.

For the fritters

SIFT flour, baking powder, salt and paprika into a large bowl and make a well in the centre.
IN a separate bowl, combine eggs, and milk.
GRADUALLY add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients and whisk until you have a smooth, lump-free batter. The batter will be quite stiff.
PLACE corn, capsicum, spring onion and herbs in a mixing bowl and add just enough of the batter to bind them.
HEAT 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan on medium heat, then drop in 2 tablespoons of batter per fritter and cook 4 fritters at a time.
COOK for 2 minutes or until the underside of each fritter is golden. Turn over and cook fritters on the other side. Transfer to a plate and keep warm while cooking the remaining fritters.
SERVE with roast tomatoes and rocket.